Extension of the KSR Data Set on Farming Solitary Bees and Wasps

Project Description

Several species of local solitary bees and wasps will nest and multiply in dense arrays of artificial cavities, and can be identified by their nests to species or group in the field. Only two of the local solitary bee species are commercially important in Canada, but understanding the propagation of all local bees and wasps may be useful in maintaining or regenerating natural habitat. Over 25000 records at Jokers, since 2001, and at two other localities, give species of bees and wasps and parasites, full counts of stage to stage survival, and causes of loss: see https://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/30434. In 2013, measurements will include the body weights of the overwintering immatures. These measurements will indicate the survival and reproductive potential of the adult solitary bees and wasps that will emerge in the Spring and early summer.

Additional Scientific Information

Two future supplements to the published Data Set (mapped counts of immatures) referenced above are (A) Data Extraction Tools (in hand) and (B) Data for 2010 onwards (in progress). For 2013-2017, additional measurements will include the body weights of the overwintering immatures. There are no extant data but these new measurements will estimate the survival and reproductive potential of the adult solitary bees and wasps that are expected to emerge in the Spring and early summer. More generally, insect counts as such are limited mainly to questions about population dynamics and immature development; knowing body weights will not only supplement counts but also begin to address questions of biomass and ecosystem function (compartments and fluxes).

Principal Investigator: Peter Hallett

2013 Nest box with roof removed showing grass nests of the cricket-using wasp Isodontia mexicana

2013 Nest box with roof removed showing grass nests of the cricket-using wasp Isodontia mexicana

publications  completedhttps://tspace.library.utoronto.ca/handle/1807/30434

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